Turf serves an important purpose: it provides recreation areas for adults, kids, and pets alike. But native grasses bring a character all their own, with the added bonus of being low-water and low-maintenance once established. Ornamental grasses can also provide height, varying texture, movement, and year-round interest. Consider adding them to your landscape this year. A few examples of Colorado native grasses for your consideration: Blue grama (Bouteloua gracilis). Did you know that Colorado has an official state grass? It…

How to cycle and soak to save water and get best watering results As temperatures rise, you may be tempted to run your sprinkler longer. But resist that temptation, and instead practice cycle-and-soak watering. It’s an efficient way to keep your landscape healthy and be sure that none of your watering goes to waste. Here’s how to cycle and soak: Break up your watering into shorter intervals. For example, if you usually water an area of lawn for about 15…

It’s getting warmer across Colorado, and our plants will need more water. But just because the drought is waning on the Front Range—for now—doesn’t mean we shouldn’t still try to conserve water. The Western Slope, which provides much of our water supply, is still in drought. And our own next drought could be just around the corner. We should give the plants the water they need but not waste a drop. One way to save water and dress up the…

There’s still time to plant some sunflowers in your landscape. The National Garden Bureau named 2021 the Year of the Sunflower, and with good reason. This cheerful plant is always a popular cut flower, and it’s easy to grow. Some facts about sunflowers: They are native to North America, so they are well-suited to grow here. They provide both nectar and seeds, making them a great plant for pollinators. The flowers move to face the sun, a process called heliotropism.…

What is a weed? It’s any plant that grows where we don’t want it. Often they are non-native, potentially invasive plants that can outgrow and crowd out the plants we put in our landscape on purpose. To avoid a big problem in the height of the growing season, take some time to stop weeds as soon as they appear. The key is to get rid of them before they flower or go to seed. There are two basic methods of…

Bindweed might look like a miniature version of morning glory, but it is a nuisance that seems like it can take over a garden almost overnight. It is very difficult to control once established in your landscape. Colorado Department of Agriculture has categorized bindweed as a noxious weed. Luckily, the department offers a tool to help you fight it. Request a bug Through the “Request-A-Bug” program, homeowners may purchase a biological pest control to deal with bindweed in their veggie…

After recent snows gave them a dose of moisture, and with temperatures heating up along the Front Range, early spring bulbs are popping up in landscapes and giving us a hint of the color to come. Crocuses, hyacinths, even some daffodils and tulips can be spotted in gardens and flower beds. The warm days might inspire you to add some color to your landscape. Keep in mind that April in Colorado could still bring us heavy snowfall or even a…

Gardening and landscape care can be a healthy hobby that helps us get outdoors and moving around. But proper form is important to avoid discomfort or injury. Vary activities and tasks frequently and include rest periods in between to help reduce the strain from repetitive motions. If hands start to tingle or the wrist and fingers hurt or feel numb, this is a signal to take a break and switch to a different task. Monitor positions and posture while gardening.…

Create a more sustainable landscape! t’s too early to start planting, but it’s a good time to make a plan for a successful landscape this year. Recent heavy snowfall was much-needed, but it has not eliminated drought in the state, so be sure that your landscape plans are strategic and water-wise. Planning a water-wise landscape Start with the sprinkler system. When water is scarce, sprinklers need to be at maximum efficiency so that every drop you use and pay for…

It’s still winter—spring officially begins March 20—and heavy snowfall predicted this weekend is a reminder that despite the change in season, March is historically Colorado’s snowiest month. Deep snowfalls—especially spring snow that tends to be heavier and wetter than powdery winter snow—can break tree limbs, smother and crush ornamental grasses and splay upright evergreens. Here are a few things to keep in mind as we head into this snowy weekend. Before the storm: Got early bulbs sprouting? Protect them from…